STACK (SUTEKU) – NAGASAKI ANTENNA SHOP

Stack is a furniture design project for Nagasaki antenna shop in collaboration with architectural office Re-Write. Like the stacked traditional Japanese wooden roof brackets, the furniture pieces are assembled by stacking wooden sticks of 40 by 40 mm thick. The character of traditional Japanese architecture elements emphasizes the local identity of this shop in Japan. This shop sells variation of local products of the prefecture Nagasaki in the south part of Japan. Certain art and food products are hard to get in any other shops in Tokyo, since some are only available in Nagasaki itself. However, the Japanese call them typically from Nagasaki, a lot of elements in this prefecture got influenced by other countries, like France, China, Portugal and the Netherlands before the 17th century. A Japanese prefecture with international allure. This local pride is shown in the blue, yellow, green and orange graphics on the wooden furniture pieces; the citrus fruits, the sea with smaller islands around, the Christian crosses and the China town lanterns. The furniture pieces are display shelves, display tables, terrace tables and benches. The wooden display shelves are the main elements of the Nagasaki antenna shop. They create open spaces and divisions between spaces of different activities. It’s more than just a shop, the wooden display shelves create a cafe space selling Nagasaki sweets and meals, a space for special lecture events and a Nagasaki travel agency.

STACK (SUTEKU) – NAGASAKI ANTENNA SHOP

Stack is a furniture design project for Nagasaki antenna shop in collaboration with architectural office Re-Write. Like the stacked traditional Japanese wooden roof brackets, the furniture pieces are assembled by stacking wooden sticks of 40 by 40 mm thick. The character of traditional Japanese architecture elements emphasizes the local identity of this shop in Japan. This shop sells variation of local products of the prefecture Nagasaki in the south part of Japan. Certain art and food products are hard to get in any other shops in Tokyo, since some are only available in Nagasaki itself. However, the Japanese call them typically from Nagasaki, a lot of elements in this prefecture got influenced by other countries, like France, China, Portugal and the Netherlands before the 17th century. A Japanese prefecture with international allure. This local pride is shown in the blue, yellow, green and orange graphics on the wooden furniture pieces; the citrus fruits, the sea with smaller islands around, the Christian crosses and the China town lanterns. The furniture pieces are display shelves, display tables, terrace tables and benches. The wooden display shelves are the main elements of the Nagasaki antenna shop. They create open spaces and divisions between spaces of different activities. It’s more than just a shop, the wooden display shelves create a cafe space selling Nagasaki sweets and meals, a space for special lecture events and a Nagasaki travel agency.

project stack
project stack
project stack

DESSAU, GERMANY
PUBLIC – CULTURAL
2017

THE WEDGE – MODERN DESIGN MUSEUM

The city of Dessau has a rich history in modernist design and locals share a down to earth attitude towards design. Here architecture doesn’t serve as a flamboyant representation of power and capital, but as a humble structure supporting and facilitating the local lives. As the city of Dessau becomes more fragmented into little islands that emit little identity, can the new museum of modernism and design rally the city and become a landscape where the city can grow upon once more?

We propose a new museum at the core of the city. We try to integrate the building into surroundings by creating a landscaped roof structure and by engaging it with the city center through a passage. The structure facilitates the natural flow of the park and enhances linear movement of the city.

The museum is embedded into its urban context where the building becomes a part of the landscape, resembling a wedge being placed on the existing park. The site is firstly trimmed according to programs. Through a humble gesture the northern site is elevated to create a noticeable accent point towards the post office building, defining boundaries.  The facilitation of the Ratgasse passage cuts the museum volume in two and it is reconnected through an underground floor within the museum. 

 The green sloping roofscape extends the park vertically and encourages people to utilize it with various activities. The roof is kept free of obstacles but filled in with facilities that generate spontaneity and creative use. We can see a multitude of different events take place like a gathering place for the Sommerkino, picnic spots, yoga field, open air stage and an observational deck. Its sloping shape provides a noticeable point of interest as it highest point leans towards the post office building. It is noticeable yet never dominant while it stimulates the interaction between locals and the park.  Its shape creates orientation in the urban context while still humbly blends in its green surrounding.

The arrangement of programs exemplifies the clarity and honesty of the new museum and portrays it as an open integral green machine. Service areas are liberated from enclosed corridors and are summoned as important actors in the experience of the entire museum. Storages become showcase vitrines, celebrating modernism art collections in an everyday fashion. By showcasing the repair studio, we seek to rise up and reinforce the awareness and social recognition of modernism artworks. It creates a setting where people can learn, recreate and experiment. The educational center is situated at the central patio, and can be easily converted to podium toward public for certain occasions. Here the knowledge about Modernism is shared and broadcasted not only to visitors but also to pedestrians passing through the passage.

Concrete and glass demonstrate a clean and monochrome background context. It shapes an autonomous space, infinite, timeless, where both the visitors and collections are being exhibited to each other.

 

project stack
project stack
project stack
 

DESSAU, GERMANY
PUBLIC – CULTURAL
2017

THE WEDGE – MODERN DESIGN MUSEUM

The city of Dessau has a rich history in modernist design and locals share a down to earth attitude towards design. Here architecture doesn’t serve as a flamboyant representation of power and capital, but as a humble structure supporting and facilitating the local lives. As the city of Dessau becomes more fragmented into little islands that emit little identity, can the new museum of modernism and design rally the city and become a landscape where the city can grow upon once more?

We propose a new museum at the core of the city. We try to integrate the building into surroundings by creating a landscaped roof structure and by engaging it with the city center through a passage. The structure facilitates the natural flow of the park and enhances linear movement of the city.

The museum is embedded into its urban context where the building becomes a part of the landscape, resembling a wedge being placed on the existing park. The site is firstly trimmed according to programs. Through a humble gesture the northern site is elevated to create a noticeable accent point towards the post office building, defining boundaries.  The facilitation of the Ratgasse passage cuts the museum volume in two and it is reconnected through an underground floor within the museum. 

 The green sloping roofscape extends the park vertically and encourages people to utilize it with various activities. The roof is kept free of obstacles but filled in with facilities that generate spontaneity and creative use. We can see a multitude of different events take place like a gathering place for the Sommerkino, picnic spots, yoga field, open air stage and an observational deck. Its sloping shape provides a noticeable point of interest as it highest point leans towards the post office building. It is noticeable yet never dominant while it stimulates the interaction between locals and the park.  Its shape creates orientation in the urban context while still humbly blends in its green surrounding.

The arrangement of programs exemplifies the clarity and honesty of the new museum and portrays it as an open integral green machine. Service areas are liberated from enclosed corridors and are summoned as important actors in the experience of the entire museum. Storages become showcase vitrines, celebrating modernism art collections in an everyday fashion. By showcasing the repair studio, we seek to rise up and reinforce the awareness and social recognition of modernism artworks. It creates a setting where people can learn, recreate and experiment. The educational center is situated at the central patio, and can be easily converted to podium toward public for certain occasions. Here the knowledge about Modernism is shared and broadcasted not only to visitors but also to pedestrians passing through the passage.

Concrete and glass demonstrate a clean and monochrome background context. It shapes an autonomous space, infinite, timeless, where both the visitors and collections are being exhibited to each other.

 

project stack
project stack
project stack
 

DESSAU, GERMANY
PUBLIC – CULTURAL
2017

THE WEDGE – MODERN DESIGN MUSEUM

The city of Dessau has a rich history in modernist design and locals share a down to earth attitude towards design. Here architecture doesn’t serve as a flamboyant representation of power and capital, but as a humble structure supporting and facilitating the local lives. As the city of Dessau becomes more fragmented into little islands that emit little identity, can the new museum of modernism and design rally the city and become a landscape where the city can grow upon once more?

We propose a new museum at the core of the city. We try to integrate the building into surroundings by creating a landscaped roof structure and by engaging it with the city center through a passage. The structure facilitates the natural flow of the park and enhances linear movement of the city.

The museum is embedded into its urban context where the building becomes a part of the landscape, resembling a wedge being placed on the existing park. The site is firstly trimmed according to programs. Through a humble gesture the northern site is elevated to create a noticeable accent point towards the post office building, defining boundaries.  The facilitation of the Ratgasse passage cuts the museum volume in two and it is reconnected through an underground floor within the museum. 

 The green sloping roofscape extends the park vertically and encourages people to utilize it with various activities. The roof is kept free of obstacles but filled in with facilities that generate spontaneity and creative use. We can see a multitude of different events take place like a gathering place for the Sommerkino, picnic spots, yoga field, open air stage and an observational deck. Its sloping shape provides a noticeable point of interest as it highest point leans towards the post office building. It is noticeable yet never dominant while it stimulates the interaction between locals and the park.  Its shape creates orientation in the urban context while still humbly blends in its green surrounding.

The arrangement of programs exemplifies the clarity and honesty of the new museum and portrays it as an open integral green machine. Service areas are liberated from enclosed corridors and are summoned as important actors in the experience of the entire museum. Storages become showcase vitrines, celebrating modernism art collections in an everyday fashion. By showcasing the repair studio, we seek to rise up and reinforce the awareness and social recognition of modernism artworks. It creates a setting where people can learn, recreate and experiment. The educational center is situated at the central patio, and can be easily converted to podium toward public for certain occasions. Here the knowledge about Modernism is shared and broadcasted not only to visitors but also to pedestrians passing through the passage.

Concrete and glass demonstrate a clean and monochrome background context. It shapes an autonomous space, infinite, timeless, where both the visitors and collections are being exhibited to each other.

 

project stack
project stack
project stack
 

PHILIPPINES
RESIDENTIAL
2019

DELTA

Just like a turtle retracts into its safe shell at the sight of danger, this house contracts to half its size (40m2) into a super resilient shape when challenged by storms and expands to double its size (80m2) in times of no immediate threat. Foldable ‘bamboo tents’ can be expanded or folder back onto the main structure, and the triangular windows and ‘wings’ can be used as shade, drying racks, market stalls, and can connect to create covered community courtyards. In addition, the pyramidal shape enhances earthquake resilience and the base is floatable for flood resilience. The natural feel of traditional Filipino Bahay-kubo houses is recreated through the use of bamboo material; the primary structure is composed of bamboo poles (12cm diameter) with trusses in between for extra stability. The bamboo is treated with a boron solution, a naturally occurring salt solution that renders the bamboo indigestible to insects. The design can be constructed within 28 days with the owner driving the construction with cost of $8,500.

 

project stack
project stack
project stack
project stack
project stack
project stack

PHILIPPINES
RESIDENTIAL
2019

DELTA

Just like a turtle retracts into its safe shell at the sight of danger, this house contracts to half its size (40m2) into a super resilient shape when challenged by storms and expands to double its size (80m2) in times of no immediate threat. Foldable ‘bamboo tents’ can be expanded or folder back onto the main structure, and the triangular windows and ‘wings’ can be used as shade, drying racks, market stalls, and can connect to create covered community courtyards. In addition, the pyramidal shape enhances earthquake resilience and the base is floatable for flood resilience. The natural feel of traditional Filipino Bahay-kubo houses is recreated through the use of bamboo material; the primary structure is composed of bamboo poles (12cm diameter) with trusses in between for extra stability. The bamboo is treated with a boron solution, a naturally occurring salt solution that renders the bamboo indigestible to insects. The design can be constructed within 28 days with the owner driving the construction with cost of $8,500.

 

project stack
project stack
project stack
project stack
project stack
project stack

PHILIPPINES
RESIDENTIAL
2019

DELTA

Just like a turtle retracts into its safe shell at the sight of danger, this house contracts to half its size (40m2) into a super resilient shape when challenged by storms and expands to double its size (80m2) in times of no immediate threat. Foldable ‘bamboo tents’ can be expanded or folder back onto the main structure, and the triangular windows and ‘wings’ can be used as shade, drying racks, market stalls, and can connect to create covered community courtyards. In addition, the pyramidal shape enhances earthquake resilience and the base is floatable for flood resilience. The natural feel of traditional Filipino Bahay-kubo houses is recreated through the use of bamboo material; the primary structure is composed of bamboo poles (12cm diameter) with trusses in between for extra stability. The bamboo is treated with a boron solution, a naturally occurring salt solution that renders the bamboo indigestible to insects. The design can be constructed within 28 days with the owner driving the construction with cost of $8,500.

 

project stack
project stack
project stack
project stack
project stack
project stack

PHILIPPINES
RESIDENTIAL
2019

DELTA

Just like a turtle retracts into its safe shell at the sight of danger, this house contracts to half its size (40m2) into a super resilient shape when challenged by storms and expands to double its size (80m2) in times of no immediate threat. Foldable ‘bamboo tents’ can be expanded or folder back onto the main structure, and the triangular windows and ‘wings’ can be used as shade, drying racks, market stalls, and can connect to create covered community courtyards. In addition, the pyramidal shape enhances earthquake resilience and the base is floatable for flood resilience. The natural feel of traditional Filipino Bahay-kubo houses is recreated through the use of bamboo material; the primary structure is composed of bamboo poles (12cm diameter) with trusses in between for extra stability. The bamboo is treated with a boron solution, a naturally occurring salt solution that renders the bamboo indigestible to insects. The design can be constructed within 28 days with the owner driving the construction with cost of $8,500.

 

project stack
project stack
project stack
project stack
project stack
project stack

PHILIPPINES
RESIDENTIAL
2019

DELTA

Just like a turtle retracts into its safe shell at the sight of danger, this house contracts to half its size (40m2) into a super resilient shape when challenged by storms and expands to double its size (80m2) in times of no immediate threat. Foldable ‘bamboo tents’ can be expanded or folder back onto the main structure, and the triangular windows and ‘wings’ can be used as shade, drying racks, market stalls, and can connect to create covered community courtyards. In addition, the pyramidal shape enhances earthquake resilience and the base is floatable for flood resilience. The natural feel of traditional Filipino Bahay-kubo houses is recreated through the use of bamboo material; the primary structure is composed of bamboo poles (12cm diameter) with trusses in between for extra stability. The bamboo is treated with a boron solution, a naturally occurring salt solution that renders the bamboo indigestible to insects. The design can be constructed within 28 days with the owner driving the construction with cost of $8,500.

 

project stack
project stack
project stack
project stack
project stack
project stack

MALAWI
PUBLIC, RESIDENTIAL
2019

Kaleidoscope of butterflies

We imagine a place that inspires children to be green leaders. A place that sparks sustainability and reuse where kids are introduced to methods as living more in harmony with nature. The school is inspired by the butterfly to represent the adventurous spirit of children wandering and exploring into their new sustainable journey.

Campus
The school campus is designed into 3 type of modules representing the school, teacher houses and student dormitories that are carefully distributed in a zigzagging layout. This configuration creates a sequence of courtyards, each with its own unique features. A courtyard for cooking, meeting, entertainment, playing and gardening. Interesting vistas to the surrounding nature strike trough the campus. To further encourage outdoor activities in the courtyards we introduce an informal shuffled butterfly pergola.

The module for school and teachers housing are accessed through a lobby. Outdoor study is stimulated trough flexible walls that open as doors allowing a more fluid experience between inside/outside.

Structure
We encourage the community spirit and with it encourage the locals to take part of building. A light wood structure lifts up the butterfly thatched roof and allows diffuse light to enter while also generating natural ventilation. The materials are locally sourced and gathered. The walls are made out of rammed earth. The pergola is made of bamboo.

Pattern
Underneath the butterfly shaped roof a weave of colorful African inspired patterns dress the façade. Although we propose a certain type of pattern we highly encourage the local community to design a pattern of their own liking and weave it together to strengthen the sense of community. Big drawings of animals paint the buildings and create a sense of joy from nature. We can imagine kids talking about the lion’s den, or the fish building.

Structure and materials
The school is a showcase of how sustainable methods of building can be something to enjoy rather then something that deprives. Rainwater is collected from rooftops and distributed to water containers that are submerged. They are made into canvases to celebrate creativity and art. Solar panels are spread out across structures representing trees made from bamboo. Tires collected from old cars and reused in a set of surprising ways. Creating furniture pieces, play elements and planters.

The school becomes a beacon of sustainable design and seeks out to deploy a way of thinking: Become more environmentally responsible without losing your cool.

project stack
project stack
project stack
project stack

PHILIPPINES
RESIDENTIAL
2019

DELTA

Just like a turtle retracts into its safe shell at the sight of danger, this house contracts to half its size (40m2) into a super resilient shape when challenged by storms and expands to double its size (80m2) in times of no immediate threat. Foldable ‘bamboo tents’ can be expanded or folder back onto the main structure, and the triangular windows and ‘wings’ can be used as shade, drying racks, market stalls, and can connect to create covered community courtyards. In addition, the pyramidal shape enhances earthquake resilience and the base is floatable for flood resilience. The natural feel of traditional Filipino Bahay-kubo houses is recreated through the use of bamboo material; the primary structure is composed of bamboo poles (12cm diameter) with trusses in between for extra stability. The bamboo is treated with a boron solution, a naturally occurring salt solution that renders the bamboo indigestible to insects. The design can be constructed within 28 days with the owner driving the construction with cost of $8,500.

 

project stack
project stack
project stack
project stack
project stack
project stack

PHILIPPINES
RESIDENTIAL
2019

DELTA

Just like a turtle retracts into its safe shell at the sight of danger, this house contracts to half its size (40m2) into a super resilient shape when challenged by storms and expands to double its size (80m2) in times of no immediate threat. Foldable ‘bamboo tents’ can be expanded or folder back onto the main structure, and the triangular windows and ‘wings’ can be used as shade, drying racks, market stalls, and can connect to create covered community courtyards. In addition, the pyramidal shape enhances earthquake resilience and the base is floatable for flood resilience. The natural feel of traditional Filipino Bahay-kubo houses is recreated through the use of bamboo material; the primary structure is composed of bamboo poles (12cm diameter) with trusses in between for extra stability. The bamboo is treated with a boron solution, a naturally occurring salt solution that renders the bamboo indigestible to insects. The design can be constructed within 28 days with the owner driving the construction with cost of $8,500.

 

project stack
project stack
project stack
project stack
project stack
project stack

PHILIPPINES
RESIDENTIAL
2019

DELTA

Just like a turtle retracts into its safe shell at the sight of danger, this house contracts to half its size (40m2) into a super resilient shape when challenged by storms and expands to double its size (80m2) in times of no immediate threat. Foldable ‘bamboo tents’ can be expanded or folder back onto the main structure, and the triangular windows and ‘wings’ can be used as shade, drying racks, market stalls, and can connect to create covered community courtyards. In addition, the pyramidal shape enhances earthquake resilience and the base is floatable for flood resilience. The natural feel of traditional Filipino Bahay-kubo houses is recreated through the use of bamboo material; the primary structure is composed of bamboo poles (12cm diameter) with trusses in between for extra stability. The bamboo is treated with a boron solution, a naturally occurring salt solution that renders the bamboo indigestible to insects. The design can be constructed within 28 days with the owner driving the construction with cost of $8,500.

 

project stack
project stack
project stack
project stack
project stack
project stack